May 21

There are many choices of charities to animate, and many causes. Some include development, war, hunger, abuse, animal rights, women’s etc. However i have decided to address the somewhat hidden issue of Blood Diamonds. A Blood Diamond is a diamond whose profits are used to fund wars and which is produced and mined under unethical conditions. The treatment of African people in order to get these diamonds is incredible.

Countries such as the Ivory Coast, Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, are or have been targeted by this problem. The fact that diamonds are advertised as and seen as symbols of love and class, has just fueled the desire for these precious stones. Would newly engaged women feel as proud of their new diamond when boasting about it to their friends if they knew that the cost of her diamond helped illegal warfare of guns to kill innocent people?

For example, in 1975 Angola liberated itself from being a Portuguese colony, but fell to a civil war from 1975 to 2002. A rebel movement at the time used diamonds as a form to fuel their war, selling diamonds abroad to buy guns. It took the UN up to 1998 to realize what was happening and ban diamond sale form Angola.

A diamond might be a ‘girls best friend’, but it is also the killer of innocent lives. The buying and selling of these Blood Diamonds, also called Conflict Diamonds is usually done in secret as to not stir too much attention.

I would like to use this subject to raise awareness of an issue that so many people are ignoring, still buying conflict diamonds.

I plan on using the International Red Cross as a charity, as they have shown certain interest on the subject.

I plan on making a simple animation with statistics and music to try and get my point across.

Here is a link to a good website: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2006/12/11/8395442/index.htm

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

3 Responses to “Blood Diamonds – Animation Idea…”

  1. DH Says:

    Conflict diamonds make up less than 1 percent of the total diamond supply today. The diamond industry has been involved with NGOs and governments in developing the Kimberley Process, which tracks the flow of rough diamonds. If you really want to make a difference, you should look to support organizations that are directly involved in this area and in diamond development, like Partnership Africa Canada (http://www.pacweb.org/e/).